Kulusuk Airport

Kulusuk airport (BGKK) is located in Kulusuk, a small town on the island with the same name. The airstrip was built by the US in 1956, to have a station for early warning. This station was closed in 1991.

Like many other airports in Greenland, it was not built at place which is suitable for commercial traffic, meaning it was not built near major towns or settlements.

The airport is approved for Short Take-Off and Landing (STOL) aircrafts, such as the De Havilland Dash 7 & 8, and serves as a mini-hub for Tasiliq. 

There are discussions in the Government on whether it should be built a new, larger airport, closer to the town of Tasiliq which would provide better fasilities and meet the demand for air travel. 

Kulusuk is served by Air Greenland (Nuuk, Nerlerit Inaat and helicopter service to Tasiilaq) and Air Iceland (Reykjavik).

CHARTS & FLIGHT PROCEDURES

Click here to download aeronautical charts for Longyear

AERODROME

The airport has a single runway (11/29), which is 1199x30 meters and made of gravel. Runway 11 is the preferred runway for arrivals, and runway 29 is the preferred runway for departure. This is due to terrain and the available procedures.

Landing Distance Available (LDA) on runway 11/29 is 1199 meters
Take-Off Distance Available (TODA) on runway 10 is 2508 meters,.

The airport has no taxiways, just a direct entry to the runway from the apron. 

DEPARTURE - IFR

Kulusuk airport has not established Standard Instrument Departures (SID). Runway 11 has departure restrictions, day and night. During daytime departures are only allowed when ceiling is above 700ft and the visibility is greater than 5000m. During nighttime the requirements for departure is a ceiling of 2500ft and a visibility of 13000m or greater (the mountains at the departure end of the runway must be clearly visible).

Operators needs to establish their own departure procedures, but for IVAO we have established recommended general departure procedures which is stated below. These can be used by most twin engine propeller aircrafts as they will be able to meet the required rate of climb to fly these procedures.

Aircraft which is planning to fly above F195 must submit their flight plan and obtain their Air Traffic Control clearance for flight in Oceanic Airspace (OCA) 20-30 minutes prior to Estimated Off Block Time (EOBT). If entering Reykjavik Oceanic airspace after departure, remember to contact Reykjavik Radio in due time before passing F195

After departure you will be informed by Kulusuk Aerodrome Flight Information Service (AFIS) when you should establish contact with Nuuk Flight Information Service (FIS). You will be informed by Nuuk FIS when you should contact Reykjavik Radio if you have flight planned in to OCA.

Departing runway 11
In Instrumental Meteorological Conditions (IMC) turn left as soon as practical, but no later than 500ft Above Ground Level (AGL), direct to fix KKF11 and backtrack the RNAV GNSS arrival procedure for runway 11, climbing as expeditiously as possible to a minimum altitude of 4300ft over ESIBA (south and eastbound flights), 6000ft over SOMEV (north- and eastbound flights) or 5000ft over LUNAL (westbound flights), before proceeding to your first enroute waypoint. If unable to reach the before mentioned altitudes, join the holding at LUNAL and climb to the appropriate altitude before proceeding to your first enroute waypoint. 

In Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) during daytime, a straight out departure (slight right turn after take-off) can be flown. In VMC, climb as expeditiously as possible by visual references to terrain to an altitude of 5500ft, and proceed direct to your first enroute waypoint. If IMC exist before 2600ft, the procedure in the above section must be used.

If IMC exist at or above 3100ft, and you are able to pass KKF41 at or above 2600ft, you can backtrack the RNAV GNSS Circling A approach procedure, climbing as expeditiously as possible to reach minimum altitude of 4500ft over BUMUD (north- and westbound flights), 3500ft over INGUB (eastbound flights) and 4000ft over URUKU (south- and westbound flights), before proceeding to your first enroute waypoint. If unable to reach the before mentioned altitudes, join the holding at INGUB and climb to the appropriate altitude before proceeding to your first enroute waypoint.

Departing runway 29
In IMC proceed direct to fix KKM11 and backtrack the RNAV GNSS arrival procedure for runway 11, climbing as expeditiously as possible to a minimum altitude of 4300ft over ESIBA (south and eastbound flights), 6000ft over SOMEV (north- and eastbound flights) or 5000ft over LUNAL (westbound flights), before proceeding to your first enroute waypoint. If unable to reach the before mentioned altitudes, join the holding at LUNAL and climb to the appropriate altitude before proceeding to your first enroute waypoint.

In VMC, climb as expeditiously as possible by visual references to terrain to an altitude of 5500ft, and proceed direct to your first enroute waypoint. If IMC exist at any time before reaching 5500ft, follow the departure procedure as stated above.  

ARRIVAL - IFR

The airport has not established Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STAR), and as such, arrival is by direct to the Initial Approach Fix (IAF) after the last enroute waypoint.

When arriving to Kulusuk you will be informed by Nuuk FIS when you contact with Kulusuk AFIS. When in contact with AFIS, state your altitude passing and descending to, routing and time estimate at significant point(s).

After your last enroute waypoint proceed direct to one of the IAFs, descending no lower altitude/flight level than the MSA (if IMC), and execute the approach in complete adherence with the procedures depicted on the charts. If IMC exist, strict adherence to the charts and these procedures are mandatory. If VMC exist, the PIC can decide to fly the arrival by visual references and make a visual approach when the airport is in sight.

Arrival to runway 29 is via the RNAV GNSS Circling A Approach procedure, or via RNAV GNSS Approach procedure for runway 11 and thereafter circle to land. Arrival to runway 11 is via RNAV GNSS Circling A Approach procedure and a circle to land, or RNAV GNSS Approach procedure for runway 11.

VFR

Traffic circuits are to be flown north of the aerodrome.

There are no established VFR reporting points, but Kap Dan, town of Kulusuk and Ammasalik Firth (as also depicted on the Visual Approach Charts) makes out natural reference points which may be used to indicate your position in relation to the aerodrome.

PHRASEOLOGY

Please refer to our AFIS section for phraseology examples.

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